Metal Roof Condensation Problems And Resolving Them

Metal Roof Condensation Problems And Resolving Them

It is easy and economical to install metal roofs over houses, sheds, barns, warehouses and even commercial buildings. With proper care, galvanized or powder coated metal roofs should last a lifetime. However, as we know, moisture combined with oxygen is the worst enemy of iron.

What happens in winter or when it rains is that the exterior temperature is lower than interior temperature. This, combined with higher humidity levels in the air inside can lead to condensation on the inner surfaces of metal tin roofs. Apart from the minor inconvenience of drips caused by metal roof condensation, the major, long term impact is that metal corrodes. If neglected, that part of the roof may need to be replaced because no amount of patching will prevent rainwater leaks in the future. If metal is laid over plywood, felt or glass wool, the condensed water can cause further damage.

One solution to preventing such condensation-related problems is to replace the entire roof with plywood or fiberglass sheets. Many have also tried attaching plastic sheeting to the tin roof as a vapour barrier, but it is a cumbersome and ineffective process. One common method of insulating the roof is to use glass wool in a bag attached to the underside of the metal roof. Humid air penetrating through gaps and cracks can still reach metal and condense causing water to collect and wet the insulation. This water does not dry out quickly and combining with oxygen in the air corrodes iron sheets quickly. In such cases where roofs have under-decks, the problem is not apparent until a large portion has corroded and water starts to drip in when it rains.

This can be resolved by coating the underside of metal tin roofs. Painting can prevent corrosion but it cannot prevent condensation. Water will still drip. A better way to protect tin sheets, and at the same time prevent condensation is to cover the underside of the roof with foam. This acts as a vapour barrier and also as an insulating material, preventing warm air inside from touching the cold metal surface and thus preventing condensation.

You can get sheets of flexible foam with an open cell or closed cell structure and glue them to the underside of the tin roof. However, in a majority of cases, such roofs usually have some form of under-decking that makes this a difficult process. The answer, therefore, is spray foam insulation. Spraying with the help of high pressure jetting equipment forces the foam in between the gaps and covers the metal with a porous, yet insulating, vapour-resistant insulating bond. The insulating layer prevents warm humid air inside from touching the cold metal surface. Moisture no longer condenses. You are no longer bothered by the problem of water drips or ponding. Your roof and the underdeck remain dry, safe and retain their physical integrity for years.

Another benefit of this type of in-situ spray foam insulation is that it eliminates the need for frequent painting of the metal surface. At the same time, since the liquid foam adheres to the metal and expands into foam to form a strong bond with metal, it also serves as an effective barrier for vapour, sound, and heat. The foam will not only prevent heat losses from inside during winter, but it will also serve as insulation against exterior heat during summer. Just spray it once and then enjoy a lifetime of peace. Condensation will not take place, and metal is fully covered with an impregnable layer of polyurethane and the roof lasts for decades.

Spray foam insulation is a precise technique that only experts with the right experience, the equipment, and the know-how can carry out to ensure perfect bonding. Their expertise also helps them calculate the precise amount of resin that will be use for a given thickness of foam insulation. Experts can also give “R” figures if asked to show the insulation value. Generally speaking, polyurethane foam has better insulation characteristics compared to glass wool or mineral wool, which means a 5 mm layer has the same insulation factor as a 10 mm rockwool layer. You only need to make sure the work is assigned to experts.

 

Using Clay Tile As Residential Roofing Material

Using Clay Tile As Residential Roofing Material

Clay tile roofs are among the most popular and are quite prominent in the western part of the United States. They possess several attractive qualities that make them a desirable choice. One of those qualities is longevity. As a general rule, clay tile roofs are easy to maintain and last a good number of years. They are also quite beautiful to look at, a trait that is yet one more great benefit they possess.

Though it may be prominent in certain parts, clay makes a good choice for residential roofing materials no matter where the home is located. It is resistant to insects, decay and mold and is very fire retardant. It will also often outlast the decking upon which it is built. Clay roofs are a great choice for home with a southwestern, Italian or Spanish Mission design. It also works great for homes with a modern, clean look.

Clay roofing is very heavy and quite expensive to install. It requires very little maintenance, as noted above and is available in a wide variety of colors, types, styles and brands. Tiles, however, are very fragile so walking on them must be accomplished quite carefully so as not to break them. This can make it difficult to clean gutters, paint or clean fireplaces. It is often advisable to hire professionals to take care of these tasks who know how to walk on such roofs without breaking the tiles.
There are several advantages to using clay as residential roofing materials. One is that the clay is non-combustible. As stated above, clay tiles are very fire retardant, in fact so much so that they just wont catch on fire. This makes clay a very attractive choice when selecting the right residential roofing materials for a new roof.

Clay tiles are also available in many different colors and styles. This makes it possible to choose from a wide variety of options and truly customize your roof the way you want it. This would also give your home a unique look. Clay roofs are also quite attractive in appearance.

Clay roofs are also easy to maintain and are extremely durable when the proper attention is given to them. Though the tiles may be easily broken when walked upon, these roofs last a very long time, often longer than the materials on which they rest.

The advantages above provide several good reasons to choose clay tiles as residential roofing materials. If you are looking for something that wont cause you a monumental headache and something you wont have to replace, a clay tile roof might be the right choice for you.

 

Using Cedar Shingles in Residential Roofing Materials

Using Cedar Shingles in Residential Roofing Materials

Cedar shingles have been quite popular and can be found on many homes. Otherwise known as wood shakes, cedar shingles make a great roofing material. Generally manufactured from western red cedar, they offer a natural look with plenty of character.

There are many variations that can be found in cedar shingles such as: color, width, thickness or wood cut. Because of this no two shake roofs will ever look the same.

Wood as residential roofing materials offers some energy benefits. It helps to insolate the attic while allowing the house to breathe by circulating the air under the small opening under the rows of felt where the shingles are laid.

It is important to note, however, that a wood shake roof does demand proper maintenance and repair. When the proper attention is not given to the roof it will simply not last. Here, mold, insects and rot can become problems. Old shake roofs cannot be recycled, thus making the overall life cycle of this type of roof quite costly.

Shake roofs require much attention and care because the appearance must be properly maintained. Doing this requires regular cleaning. Also, most wood shake roofs are unrated by fire safety codes.
Many use wipe or spray on fire retardants which offer minimal protection and only last a few years. Pressure treated shakes, however, include fire retardant substances in their materials and actually do meet national fire safety standards. This also extends the life of the roof.

Cedar shingles are dwindling in popularity because of the fire risks associated with them. In spite of this, cedar shingles possess a royal look that other residential roofing materials do not.

The installation of wood shingles is a more complicated process than installing composite shingles and the quality of the finished roof will depend greatly on the experience of the roofing contractor and caliber of shakes used.
The best shakes come from the heartwood of large old cedar trees. Because of this, much care should be taken when shakes are selected due to the variance in quality from different shake mills.

All in all, shake roofs can be quite beautiful and elegant in appearance. Though they do present some definite risks and require regular maintenance, they can be an option if you are searching for residential roofing materials with a unique look or if you just prefer cedar shingles.
If you choose a type already treated with a fire retardant and are willing to put in the time it takes to properly care for this type of roof, cedar shingles may be the right choice for you and your home.

 

The Use of Metal in Residential Roofing Materials

The Use of Metal in Residential Roofing Materials

There are many types of residential roofing materials. One that is a very popular choice is metal. Metal roofs are known to last a long time, sometimes over 50 years, and are able to withstand many different types of elements from rain to wind and even snow and ice.

The materials used for metal roofs range widely from steel to copper, tin and aluminum. Though metal roofs were used frequently in the past, they are now coming back into style. They are extremely expensive to build and come in a variety of conditions.
Two popular types are galvanized or galvalume. Galvanized is the most widely used of the two while galvalume is frequently used in the south where hurricanes are a common occurrence.

Metal roofs are durable because of their fire retardant properties. They are also almost maintenance free and energy efficient. This is because metal reflects heat, therefore blocking its transfer into the attic of the home. Coatings with high reflective values to steel sheeting will actually increase the thermal efficiency of homes located in areas where the temperatures are often high.

Steel roofs offer other benefits when used as residential roofing materials. They offer 60 to 65 percent recyclable material, thus making them an environmentally friendly choice. They also weigh very little which means this type of roof can be installed over an existing one. This eliminates the need to dispose of access material that would otherwise exist if it was first necessary to remove a pre-existing roof.

Standing-seam roofing is the most popular choice for residential roofing materials today. The term standing-seam refers to upturned edge of one metal panel that connects it to other adjacent sections of the roof.
This creates vertical lines that are distinctive in nature and makes it a trendy choice with a historical look. Metal roofs can also be constructed to resemble wood shakes, clay tiles, shingles and Victorian metal tiles.

Here, aluminum or coated steel may be formed into individual shingles or tiles or into modular panels that mimic them. Because of this, the installation of some types of metal roofing can be quite an intricate process and is best accomplished by someone who is a professional roofer.
Also, the initial cost of a metal roof that is premium in value is higher than most other residential roofing materials. Still, when you take the low maintenance and longevity factors into consideration, it may be well worth the investment.

 

The Use of Slate in Residential Roofing Materials

The Use of Slate in Residential Roofing Materials

Slate roofing is a popular choice for many residential roofs. Slate is composed of actual shingle-like slivers of rock and is often seen on more upscale homes. It is among the residential roofing materials that are long lasting and nearly indestructible. In fact, a slate roof that is over 100 years of age is not uncommon.

Slate can be manufactured into roofing slates, also referred to as shingles and are installed by a slater. Slate, however, contains two lines of breakability: cleavage and grain. This makes it possible for the slate to be split into thin sheets.

Though slate is an expensive choice in terms of available residential roofing materials, it affords a look that is very natural and can be laid out in a variety of patterns, thus creating even more options.

The benefits of slate are identical to those of tile roofing. Slate roofs have a very long lifespan and provide good fire protection. They are also very low maintenance and do not succumb easily to rot or insect damage. Slate roofing also comes in a wide selection of colors and sizes, though the colors are mostly akin to those found in nature.

Slate when used as residential roofing materials is an ideal choice in part because of its durability. Because of this, a slate roof is often considered to be the best type available. It may last between 75 to 150 years or longer.

Also like tile roofing, slate can be a very heavy material. This means it may require additional support that can be quite expensive. It is, however, as resistant to outside influences as clay tile. One factor to keep in mind when choosing a slate roof is that it is quite breakable when walked on thus making it somewhat difficult to perform regular rooftop maintenance, gutter cleaning and painting. It is for this reason that a professional should be called on to perform these tasks.

Slate roofs are often expensive to install, sometimes costing as much as the house it will rest upon. The best part about this, however, is that it will never need to be replaced in your lifetime, a fact that definitely makes choosing a slate roof worth due consideration. It is for this reason slate is an attractive choice for residential roofing materials and why this type of roof can be found on many homes. This is a perfect example of how the true benefits can really outweigh the concerns and why a slate roof may turn out to be the best investment you’ve ever made.

 

What to Consider When Choosing Residential Roofing Materials

What to Consider When Choosing Residential Roofing Materials

When it comes to replacing the roof on your home, you want to make sure the right materials are used. This is important because you want to know the roof will last you a long time and will be able to withstand the various natural elements as well as possible disasters that can damage or even completely destroy it.
This article will show you how to decide which materials will work best for you and provide you with the information you will need to make the right decision.

There are many different types of roofing materials from which to choose. When selecting the right residential roofing materials for your home you will be faced with the option of using the same material as before or choosing a new one.

Some materials are environmentally friends while others are long lasting or low maintenance. Those that fall into the last category may be the choice for many because they are easy to care for on a regular basis.
Still, there are many types, all of which possess varying properties. The particular material you choose will depend heavily on your needs and personal preferences. It may also depend on where you live as different locations mean different risks associated with them.

Before making your choice, you should first consider the life cycle cost of your residential roofing materials. Some of the more expensive materials require less maintenance and have a much longer life cycle than other less expensive options.
For example, an asphalt composition roof might last only 20 years while a metal roof could last more than 50.
This is an important part of the decision making process and can actually be the main determining factor in the choice you make.

When choosing residential roofing materials, you need to consider both the current and potential value of your home as well as its age. This information will be important when calculating whether or not a particular roofing material is actually too expensive.
If you could wind up paying for many repairs or a new roof altogether in the near future, a more expensive roof might actually turn out to be a better choice.
Though you will be paying for it all at once, you can rest easy knowing it will last a long time and you wont have to worry about it for many, many years.

Sometimes a new roof isn’t an option. Other times, however, you will have the luxury of making the choice of whether or not to replace your roof at the present time.

Knowing how to choose the right residential roofing materials before hand will help you in either situation and enable you to maintain the overall value of your home.

 

Metal Roofing Information For Homeowners

Metal Roofing Information For Homeowners

Metal roofing Information

The housing industry has continued to see an increased demand for metal roofing. As a contractor we believe that homeowners are really beginning to see the value of a metal roof. The upfront cost of steel roofing can be 1.5-2 times more than most shingles, but if you think about replacing that composition system 2-3 times in the next 60 years it changes the equation.

We believe its worth the investment to utilize a metal roofing system. Metal rates better with insurance companies than many other types of roofing shingles. In fact in some states you can save substantially off of your home insurance using a steel panels.

You will want to be sure that the company installing your steel roofing is a licensed, bonded and insured contractor. You will also want to make sure that the contractor is certified with the material they are installing.

Steel roofing Panels Are Water Shedding

An interesting fact I learned about metal or steel roofing is that the system is water shedding, not water proof. Don’t get me wrong please, they are designed to keep water out of your house and do that effectively. Manufacturers however warranty their panels, the paint and material. If you want a guarantee for the “water tight metal system” you have to install the system with special specifications determined by the manufacturer. Depending on the manufacturer this upgraded warranty can cost extra money. Metal roofs are absolutely safe, as long as they are installed correctly, so choose your contractor wisely. Like wood shake and concrete tile, a lot of importance is placed on underlayment when installing a metal roof.

Metal roofing And Underlayment

One more pointer for installing a metal roof is making sure you use a good underlayment. A standard 15 # felt underlayment should not be used. If you are going to use a felt underlayment you should use 30#. We suggest using one of the following two products as underlayment:

Leak Barrier: SBS Modified Peel And Stick Membrane

Leak barrier also known as ice and water shield is used to protect a roofs most critical leak areas. Please see “Why leak barrier is critical to your roofing system”, to learn more. On a metal roof it is a best practice to use leak barrier on valleys, step walls, penetrations, ridges and around the entire perimeter edge on both eaves and rakes. To further protect your roof and home we suggest using leak barrier as the underlayment on the entire roof. It is applied the same way as any other underlayment, but offers significantly more protection. This product is more expensive and labor intensive in comparison to standard felt underlayment’s, but well worth the extra expense for the level of security and peace of mind it brings to your home.

Titanium UDL Synthetic Underlayment

Titanium UDL is the most common upgrade choice for underlayment’s under metal roofing. Its most common use is on commercial buildings, but it is used frequently on residential roofing applications as well. Titanium UDL is 8 times lighter and stronger than 30 # felt. It carries a class A fire rating, the highest fire rating. It is impervious to mold growth. Its most treasured feature is the temperature performance. It a can handle extreme temperatures between -40 F to 240 F. Like leak barrier it is more expensive than felt underlayment’s, but well worth the price.

If you are considering installing a new roof on your home consult a professional roofing contractor.

 

The 4 Most Common Residential Roofing Materials

The 4 Most Common Residential Roofing Materials

Why Research roofing Materials

There may be many reasons you might be searching for the best roofing materials for your home. You may have an unresolved warranty problem and you want to find a product from a manufacturer you can trust in the future. Or you may be dealing with a leaky roof and want to find the best replacement product during the process of getting it to stop. You are here because you want to have a clearer understanding of what roofing materials options you have and we wrote this information to make sure you can proceed with confidence and peace of mind.

About Basic roofing Materials

Let’s cover the basics of roofing materials while you become familiar with some of the products common to almost all roofing materials systems. The roofing materials on your home are there to shed all of nature’s elements and keep them from damaging your homes structure. Since these elements can consist of rain, snow, and even wind-driven debris it is important for you to understand that every roofing materials system is comprised of more than just the outer shell that we see.

It is therefore important to understand that every roofing system will include some form of underlayment be it an asphalt impregnated or synthetic underlayment sheet or possibly a thin rubber membrane product to guard against ice damming as well as giving added protection in valley areas.

All of these roofing materials systems will also require the appropriate accessories designed for the particular installation and the individual product. You will discover more on these accessories as you research which products are best for your needs.

Different Products for Different Price Points and Regions

It is valuable to understand that there is a reason why different products are used in different regions of the country. Are you looking for a product you found on the internet but you can’t seem to find it at your local building center. There might be a reason for this. Probably one of the best examples of this would be asphalt shingles.

Of the products we are about to cover asphalt shingles are the most sensitive to extreme sunlight and heat. As a result you will not see them as often in arid regions. On the other end of this topic you will probably not select a new clay tile roof if your plans are based around a cost based decision. So let’s research the 4 most common roofing materials used on the US today.

The Top 4 Choices

We will cover these roofing materials starting from the most economical to the most expensive and I will note that this range is based on average total installed costs.

1. Asphalt Shingles- Residential asphalt shingles come in a variety of styles and weights. The most basic of roofing materials are known as 3-tab asphalt shingles and are distinguished by the two rain grooves on each shingle strip. The most commonly used asphalt shingle today is referred to as an architectural or laminated shingle. These are typically a strip shingle with no grooves but with a buildup layered surface to create the appearance of a dimensional product.

All modern asphalt shingles carry a “Class A” fire rating which means they may qualify for a reduced rate on your homeowners insurance.

If you have heard of or been involved in any of the recent asphalt shingle problems it is valuable to know that asphalt shingles have had some warranty law suits in recent years particularly with companies that have gone out of business. Be sure and research the current warranties of products in your market today as the companies currently available have greatly improved their warranty coverage’s.

2. Cedar Shakes-Residential cedar shakes have been around for over a hundred years. Split cedar shakes are characterized by their deep rich dimensional appearance. You may like the fact that one of the best properties of real cedar shakes is that cedar is naturally resistant to rot and decay. Because cedar shakes are created from natural wood the market pricing of the shakes will change with the local markets.

The only real drawback to choosing a roofing materials system of natural cedar shakes is that they are a very slow to install labor intensive process. The upside is that natural cedar shakes will ultimately deliver a beautiful roof system for decades to come.

3. Metal roofing-Manufactured metal roofing is rapidly becoming a roofing product of choice in many parts of the country. If you are considering a metal you then you might like to know that metal roofing now comes in preformed panels that resemble shingles, cedar shakes, or even clay tiles in appearance but without the inherent problems or weight.

Most residential metal roofing is manufactured in a 29 gauge thick panel that is hot dip galvanized before the finish surface is applied. All most all metal roofing carries a “Class A” fire rating which may qualify for a homeowner’s insurance deduction.

If you are considering a panel type metal roofing be sure and ask about concealed fastener standing seam products as well as exposed fastener systems.

4. Clay Tile roofing-Clay tile is considered by many to be the most durable and prestigious of roofing materials available. If you live in a hot or arid region then one of the most outstanding properties of clay tile is that the majority of products achieve a high enough reflective rating to qualify them for energy star. For you the homeowner this means a naturally much cooler roof which aids in helping reduce cooling costs.

Clay tile roofing materials also carry a “Class A” fire rating once again a valuable consideration with your insurance company.

Where to From Here
Armed with this new knowledge you are now better prepared to research in more depth the particular products best suited for your home. We mentioned earlier that each of these products is only the primary part of a complete system. Once you determine which product you want to work with we encourage you to learn more about the accessory products as well as the installation system associated with the primary product. As you continue your research you will also want to get information on how to select the best installer for your project.

Roofing Replacement – The Seven Basics

Roofing Replacement – The Seven Basics

There are seven Basic elements in your roofing. The Support, the Deck, the Underlayment, the Roof Covering, the Flashing, the Ridge Vents, and the Design.

1: The structure under your actual roofing; the support beams (rafters, trusses), typically in the attic, that support the roof structure from underneath. You need to conduct a thorough inspection of your home’s attic, or have it done by a professional and go with them to see the condition for yourself. If your supporting structures are warped, rotten, insect ridden or otherwise damaged, you should not consider replacing what’s above those structures until you address the quality and strength of your roof’s supports.

2: The Deck: which is sometimes called sheathing; that’s the wood (typically plywood panels) or metal sheeting attached to these supports. When you eventually choose a roofing contractor and sign a contract, be sure it specifies the cost that contractor charges to replace any panels. Neither you nor your contractor will know how many, if any, panels are damaged and in need of replacement until the contractor removes the old roof covering materials. We suggest that you ask your contractor to specify in the contract how many panels they’ll replace for free, along with the cost of additional replacements. This avoids confusion or any feeling that you are being taken advantage of with ‘hidden’ costs.

3: The Underlayment: It’s that material that looks like black paper or felt that covers up the Deck panels. It’s often saturated with asphalt and provides moisture and air barrier lay over the deck.

4: The Roof Covering, typically Shingles or Tiles, which are the exterior elements that come into direct contact with the elements. They are your home’s first line of defense against rain, snow, ice, hail and high winds. In the United States, the most popular covering by far is Asphalt Shingles, but roof covering can also be clay or concrete tiles, wood, metal or a synthetic material. For more about Asphalt shingles, refer to our Tutorial called “Asphalt Shingles”. Newer technology incorporating fiberglass has revolutionized asphalt shingles and greatly improved their performance and lifespan.

5: The Flashing that waterproofs and weather proofs those parts of your home most likely to collect water or leak. This is especially true with anything that protrudes through your roof, like your chimney, skylights, exhaust events. Also, edges of your roofing or the ‘valley’ where two sloping sections of roof connect are locations where water or snow will naturally accumulate, so flashing can help protect you from that water.

Flashing is usually sheet metal that is bent and formed to provide that barrier between your roofing and whatever is protruding through it. It can be galvanized steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper or some other metals, or a synthetic material. The formed flashing has to assure that water can not penetrate into or through your roofing system. Water can find its way into your roofing by gravity, by surface tension, or by high winds that actually drive it upwards.

6: The Ridge Vents that typically sit at the highest point of your roof, to allow for air flow through your attic. The Ridge vents help balance the temperature between outside and inside, which can help prevent damage like a warped deck or cracked shingles. A properly ventilated attic is a key to a healthy roofing system. These ridge vents atop your roof will be covered by materials that match the covering you choose. For example, if you cover your roof with shingles, there will be matching shingle material covering your ridge vents.

7: The Roof Design: The shape, arrangement and slope of the different sections of your roof that determine its ability to shed water and withstand infiltration of air and moisture. For more details about Roof Design Terms, refer to our Tutorial called “Roof Design Terms”. For general purposes, just realize that the complexity of your roof’s design, the more individual sections, the more protrusions, overhangs, et cetera, that more material and labor will be needed to properly complete your job.

I hope this helps you get started, and feel free to drop me a line about your renovation project. Good luck and enjoy your home!

 

Flat Roof Repair

Flat Roof Repair

Most flat roofs are found on commercial buildings and were probably installed by professional commercial roofers with flat roofing experience; however, you will find some residences with this type of installation. Unfortunately, most of these installs were done by contractors with little or no experience dealing with this type of roofing and end up requiring repair long before reaching the minimum life expectancy of the materials.

Materials

Most of the leaks requiring repairs are those installed with a single ply rubber membrane called EPDM (ethylene propylene diene terpolymer). This type of roofing material has replaced the earlier style of flat roofing which was made up of a base sheet and multiple layers of felt paper and hot asphalt or coal tar. Usually this was covered with gravel to give it increased life. This type of flat roofing is called BUR (built up roofing). In most cases this type of roofing although using less high tech materials out lasts the EPDM roofing in residential applications due to the inconsistency in installation procedures.

Finding a Contractor

If you decide that repairing your flat roof is not worth the cost and you want to have the roof replaced, be sure to find a roofing contractor with experience installing flat roofs. Get referrals and check them out before you sign a contract. You may find it difficult to locate a competent roofer that will install flat roofing on a residence. You can be an expert asphalt shingle roofer and not know how to put on a flat rubber roof. Most of the pros limit their projects to commercial installations, but if you take your time and keep looking, you can find them.

Which System is Best?

Today’s new flat roof installations offer a variety of materials. There are those that still claim EPDM single ply membranes – the most common system in the US and the material of choice for the low-slope Commercial Roofing industry for over 40 years – is still the best system to use. Others claim the newer materials like TPO (thermoplastic polyefin, SBS (self adhering membrane systems) or a PVC membrane using hot air welded seams would be a much better solution. You will find roofing contractors that vigorously defend their preferred system. Your best bet is to find a roofing contractor in your area with a long history of service and check out his referrals. Some of these systems work best in extreme heat or cold, so your location might make a difference.

Let the Pros Check it Out first

You should always have an experienced roofing contractor examine your roof before you try to do the repairs yourself. Often an experienced contractor can see damage that the homeowner cannot see. Depending on your situation, they might be able to do the repair for what you would pay in material costs by doing it yourself.